Loveland Reporter-Herald: Weigh and Win Success Story and Senior Manager of Prevention & Wellness Solutions at Kaiser Permanente, Speak to the Benefits of Incentivized Weight Loss

Loveland Reporter-Herald: Weigh and Win Success Story and Senior Manager of Prevention & Wellness Solutions at Kaiser Permanente, Speak to the Benefits of Incentivized Weight Loss

July 15, 2016

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With kiosks, dieters get in it to win it

Weigh and Win program offers free, fun, incentive-based weight-loss alternative

By Jeannie Lancaster For the Reporter-Herald 

Posted:   07/25/2015 08:13:59 AM MDT
Participants in the Weigh and Win program can visit any of the over 68 kiosks. Matt Norris enjoyed the convenience of the kiosk at McKee Medical Center.
Participants in the Weigh and Win program can visit any of the over 68 kiosks. Matt Norris enjoyed the convenience of the kiosk at McKee Medical Center. (Jeannie Lancaster / For the Reporter-Herald)

Individuals across Colorado have los more than 200,000 pounds since 2011, using a free weight-loss program developed through a partnership between incentaHEALTH and Kaiser Permanente.

Matt Norris, of Loveland, is one of the more than 64,000 people who have signed up with Weigh and Win, an incentive-based weight-loss program. The program is available to all Colorado residents 18 and older.

Norris first learned about Weigh and Win while doing an internship at McKee Medical Center.

A Weigh and Win kiosk, one of 68 throughout the state, was close to where he worked each day. At the time, Norris weighed 266 pounds.

“I decided to give it a shot,” Norris said. “It was actually kind of fun. It got to be like a game. The cash awards don’t hurt either.”

Using the Weigh and Win program, individuals sign up online and then regularly weigh in at one of the private, automated kiosks around the state. Participants are required to weigh in at least quarterly but can choose to weigh more frequently.

Matt Norris enjoys the structure and the rewards offered through the Weigh and Win Program. "It makes it kind of like a game — like a

Matt Norris enjoys the structure and the rewards offered through the Weigh and Win Program. “It makes it kind of like a game — like a contest,” he said. (Jeannie Lancaster / For the Reporter-Herald)

“Incentives are based on research that shows that incentives draw people into programs,” Bayer said.

Individuals who have a BMI of 25 or greater can receive cash incentives, which are based on the percentage of weight lost quarterly.

“It’s not enough money that it’s going to make a huge difference in your life,” Norris said. “But it gives you that little bit of push, especially once you start losing some weight, and you’re getting close to a weigh-in deadline.”

Individuals with a healthy BMI can also participate and be eligible for prizes by accruing points in a variety of ways including: completion of weekly journals, reading emails and participating in quarterly weigh-ins.

“You get a point for opening an email,” Norris said. “You rack up points. Every month, they have drawings for different things. One month it was for Fitbits. If you have over a threshold of points, you are entered into the drawing.”

Long said the average weight improvement for a successful Weigh and Win participant after a year in the program is 17.7 pounds, an 8 percent weight loss, according to Long.

A kiosk opened at Kaiser Permanente’s Loveland Medical Office in December 2012. The kiosk at McKee Medical Center opened in June 2013. Since their installations, there have been 6,430 pounds lost in Loveland through the Weigh and Win program.

“Recent research suggests that a weight loss of 3-5 percent can reduce a person’s risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, certain cancers and the need for cholesterol and heart medications,” a press recent press release from Weigh and Win stated.

Norris said a person could weigh him or herself on a bathroom scale, but it’s not the same as the program.

“Having the kiosk and the structure and the rewards, makes it kind of like a game — like a contest. You feel like you are on your own little game show, your own version of ‘The Biggest Loser,'” Norris said.

Norris said his family was “ecstatic.”

“We’ve been trying to eat better,” he said. “It never took for us. With Weigh and Win, it held me accountable.”

To learn more about Weigh and Win, visit www.weighandwin.com.

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